Brown, Fuzzy & on the Go: Domokun in Italy

domo tackles the bocca della verita

Bocca della Verita, Rome | Canon Powershot A80

In March 2004, Domo-kun and I rendezvoused in the land of pasta, pizza, and piety, spending a good chunk of our two weeks in Rome, Perugia, and the Cinque Terre. (You can read about our first adventure together here.) I fully assumed (and was totally fine with the idea) that we’d do nothing but stuff our faces or be in shambling comas from said face-stuffing. What I didn’t expect was someone as seemingly savage as Domo to appreciate fine art and architecture, but he did.

In Rome, our feet soon ached from inspecting the intricate ceilings, stunning stained glass, and hand-hewn pews of each basilica we passed. He insisted that we stop at every Bernini fountain to marvel at the marble masterpieces, but he refused to wade in the Trevi Fountain à la Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, claiming that the water would make him frizzy. We did, however, visit the Bocca della Verita and re-enact the classic Audrey Hepburn/Gregory Peck scene in Roman Holiday (although his performance was admittedly half-hearted since he has no hands to begin with). Naturally, we checked many other popular attractions off our sightseeing list and even let a gypsy woman and her children by the Colosseum rifle through our bags. We veered from the tourist track and caught a glimpse of Rome’s small punk scene in a graffiti-covered squat, where Taxi and two other Italian bands covered relatively obscure acts like Johnny Moped and the Normals.

domo with nude; tiger lily and the bocca della verita

Domo with nude in Piazza del Quirinale; Tiger Lily gives the Bocca della Verita a hand

domokun-coliseum

Colosseum, Rome

domokun-rome

Arco di Constantino and the Colosseum, Rome

dead roman pigeon

Incident at Arco di Constantino—the pigeon started it

forum

Roman forum

domo at the forum

Roman forum

teatro di marcello

Crumbling ruins everywhere: Teatro di Marcello, Rome

vittorio emanuele

Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II, Rome

domo at

Trevi Fountain, Rome

domokun-rome

Piazza della Repubblica, Rome

castel sant'angelo

Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome

airing dirty laundry

Ghetto, Rome

santa maria maggiore ceiling

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome

Piazza Navona

Piazza Navona, Rome

fascist groove thang

Fascist neoclassicism: Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, EUR, Rome

tiburtina graffiti

Graffiti in Tiburtina, Rome

roman squat

Roman squat

taxi

Taxi performs in Roman squat

winged wedding cake

Monument of Vittorio Emanuele II, Rome

old rome

Roman forum

view from a train

Train to Umbria

Come for the Wine‘s Marcy Gordon and her Italian friend Fabio met up with us in the walled hill town of Perugia, the capital of the region of Umbria and known for its annual Umbria Jazz Festival, a chocolate fest, and several universities. Together we awkwardly engaged in la passeggiata (evening stroll), broke bread with Buddhist anarchists, and trudged along snow-lined Monte Subasio. Between heavy, leisurely meals, we took daytrips to Assisi and other cobblestoned, red-roofed Umbrian towns, making sure to get lost at least thrice between destinations.

perugia rooftops

Perugia rooftops

domo in italy

Domo in the Piazza Navona, Rome; Assisi man startles Domo

top of the world

Snowy Monte Subasio

domo and the sorta-leaning tower of pisa

Not-so-leaning tower of Pisa

Domo and I eventually made our way to the Cinque Terre, stopping off at Pisa for a quick photo jaunt. Somehow, we couldn’t capture the tower’s legendary lean before time came to scramble back to the train station, but once we arrived in Riomaggiore (the southernmost of Cinque Terre’s five coastal villages), our disappointment evaporated. The Cinque Terre is for the most part accessible only by a small train or on foot, which means it’s absurdly quiet and hasn’t changed much in hundreds of years. It was also markedly warmer and sunnier than the other parts of Italy we’d been to. We joined high-heeled Italian women and their children on the rugged trail that connects the five villages, absolutely enchanted that the flora and craggy coastline reminded us of the California coast. The expansive view of the stepped hills, tight cluster of colorful homes, and the Mediterranean Sea’s sparkling turquoise water, coupled with a series of brief but arduous ascents, was truly breathtaking.

We overnighted in charming, tranquil Vernazza, the second-northernmost village, and considered staying there forever—until we heard the Clash and Green Day reverberating through the night. I remembered that I wasn’t ready to retire from rock ‘n’ roll just yet; he realized that he still needed urban discord to fuel his daily rawr and fist-shake. And so with that we returned to our respective noisy, messy homes. Check back soon for more of our adventures together!

pulling into cinque terre

Cinque Terre train

cinque terre trail

Cinque Terre trail to Corniglia

domo at corniglia train station

Waiting for the Cinque Terre train

classic shot of vernazza in the cinque terre

Vernazza, Cinque Terre

domokun chick orgy

Italian chick orgy, Gubbio

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4 Comments

Filed under domokun, photography, travel

4 responses to “Brown, Fuzzy & on the Go: Domokun in Italy

  1. Pingback: Brown, Fuzzy & on the Go: Domo-kun in England | MESSIN AROUND

  2. Oh Domo!!! That was one of the best trips EVER. Our crazy hike on Mt. Subasio was a highlight. My favorite photo is Domo at the Bocca della Verita. That is a classic for all time. I’ve always loved the one in Assisi too, where that man is wondering what the heck was going on. And the chicks in Gubbio is a great one too. But where is the one Domo took of you at the Bocca Della Verita? *That* one defies descripton.

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